Learn About SPēD Certification

SPēD is an acronym for the Security Professional Education Development Program. The SPēD Certification Program is part of the Department of Defense's (DoD) initiative to professionalize the security workforce. This initiative is intended to ensure that there is a common set of competencies among security practitioners that promotes interoperability, facilitates professional development and training, and develops a workforce of certified security professionals. View a video overview of the SPēD Program. For questions about the SPeD Certification Program, please visit our frequently asked questions. For more information about eligibility, registration, and procedures in the SPēD Program, please review the SPēD Certification Program Handbook.

SPēD News

The Candidate Handbook is updated! It includes information on SFPC, SAPPC, and SPIPC in a new, easy-to-read format. Go to SPēD Certification Program Handbook to get started.

Who is eligible to become certified?

  • DoD personnel assigned to a security position
  • DoD personnel who volunteer for SPēD Certification testing
  • DoD contractor personnel performing security duties directly for a DoD Component
  • Industry security professionals and practitioners performing duties under the National Industrial Security Program

What types of certification are available?

There are three core certifications within the SPēD Certification Program:

  1. Security Fundamentals Professional Certification (SFPC)
    Provides a recognized and reliable indication of a security practitioner's understanding of foundational concepts, principles, and practices needed to successfully perform functions, implement programs, and pursue missions to protect DoD assets. The SFPC must be conferred prior to the conferral of another core certification. NCCA accredited in December 2012.
  2. Security Asset Protection Professional Certification (SAPPC)
    Provides a recognized and reliable indication of a security practitioner's ability to apply foundational concepts, principles, and practices needed to successfully perform functions, implement programs, and pursue missions to protect DoD assets. NCCA accredited in January 2014.
  3. Security Program Integration Professional Certification (SPIPC)
    Provides a recognized and reliable indication of a security practitioner's understanding and ability to apply risk management and security program management concepts, principles, and practices.

Specialty certification and credential

Adjudicator Professional Certification (APC). The APC provides the recognition and official record of an individual's demonstrated understanding and application of the occupational and technical knowledge, skills, and expertise necessary to proficiently perform essential adjudicator tasks with the exception of due process functions.

Due Process Adjudicator Professional Credential (DPAPC). The DPAPC provides the recognition and official record of an individual’s demonstrated understanding and application of occupational and technical knowledge, skills, and expertise necessary to proficiently perform essential due process adjudicator tasks (i.e., writing SORs, evaluating responses to SOR, and recommending eligibility determinations or other functions following evaluation of responses to SORs).

Currently, in order to achieve APC/DPAPC, an individual must achieve a passing score on two assessments:  the APC or DPAPC Job Knowledge and the APC or DPAPC Practical Knowledge assessments. Soon, as a result of an ongoing APC/DPAPC assessment refresh effort, the two APC/DPAPC assessments will be combined into one assessment. The beta test period for the refreshed assessment is scheduled to be launched in March 2014. Keep checking in for additional details.

Industrial Security Oversight Certification (ISOC). The ISOC provides the recognition and official record of an individual's demonstrated understanding and application of competencies such as:  information security; classification management; incident response; information assurance/cybersecurity; personnel security; physical security; industrial security; general security; the National Industrial Security Program; foundational concepts in facility security and clearance; general safeguard requirements; facility surveys; and inspections.

In March 2014, the production version was released via commercial testing. DoD and other U.S. Government personnel (civilian and military) and contractors under the National Industrial Security Program who are conferred with the Security Fundamentals Professional Certification (SFPC) are welcome to participate. Log on to My SPēD Certification and continue your professional journey.

Physical Security Certification (PSC). The PSC provides the recognition and official record of an individual’s demonstrated understanding and application of competencies such as:  physical security concepts; installation and physical access control; physical security for conventional arms, ammunitions, and explosives (AA&E); key, combination, and lock control; site lighting; protective barriers; security systems; standards for storage of classified information; emergency management and emergency response; and physical security planning and plan implementation. The beta test period ended in October 2013 and the PSC production version is scheduled for commercial testing in the second quarter of FY14. Keep checking in for additional details.

Are you a DoD Component SPēD PMO?

The Defense Security Service (DSS) is committed to supporting the Department of Defense (DoD) and its components' efforts in promoting the SPēD certification program.
View resources for DoD Components SPēD PMOs »